Improving Riverside Vegetation for Wildlife and People

 Youth Conservation Corps members cut the invasive species, Russian Olive, along the banks of the Gunnison River. Native trees and shrubs were planted to improve riparian habitat.

Youth Conservation Corps members cut the invasive species, Russian Olive, along the banks of the Gunnison River. Native trees and shrubs were planted to improve riparian habitat.

Russian olive is a pesky, non-native species that's taken over many river banks. It's dense growth and thorns can prevent people who want to go fishing from getting to the river. It also chokes out native vegetation and sucks up water from the floodplain.

To improve riparian habitat and recreational opportunities, the Uncompahgre Partnership (UP) coordinated with various partners to control this invasive plant on 8.9 miles of land along the Gunnison River east of Delta, Colorado.

This project wouldn't have gotten off the ground without funding from the Colorado Water Conservation Board. In addition, several groups completed the difficult work of cutting the trees. Out hats go off to the: River Restoration Adventure of Tomorrow (RRAFT), Western Slope Youth Conservation Corps, Colorado Department of Corrections, and the Bureau of Land Management.